Tag Archives: Rush Limbaugh

The Mary Mac Show | When Someone Famous Is Sick or Has Died

The Mary Mac Show PodcastExperiencing the death of a significant person in our life is extremely difficult. But what if our grief is directed toward someone we don’t personally know?

In Episode 10, Mary honors Alex Trebek who has been battling stage 4 pancreatic cancer since March, 2019, Rush Limbaugh who announced his advanced stage lung cancer diagnosis on February 3, 2020 and Kobe Bryant, who along with eight others including his 13 year-old daughter, Gianna, was killed on January 26, 2020 in a helicopter crash in Calabasas, California.

Others might make us feel we don’t have a right to feel the way we do, but this is nonsense. If we have followed the careers of these individuals and they have brought insight, education and entertainment into our lives, we can have feelings of sadness, even shock, when our hero is stricken by a significant illness or dies too soon.

Alex Trebek has hosted Jeopardy for over thirty years and it is one of the most successful game shows of all time.

Hosting the most successful radio talk show, with an audience of 25 million people who tune in each weekday for three hours to hear him, Rush Limbaugh has hosted his signature The Rush Limbaugh Show also for over three decades sharing his political commentary.

Kobe Bryant, a professional basketball player, led his team, the Los Angeles Lakers, to five championship seasons and won gold medals on two USA Olympic basketball teams.

All three men were philanthropists who gave to others less fortunate than themselves for decades, often in secret.

It is natural to want to cheer on successful people and live vicariously through them. When we watch and listen to them on a frequent basis, we feel a solid connection to them. They become part of our lives.

Visit here to listen to Episode 10 and share your comments below.

Tony Snow – A Good and Faithful Servant

I can’t remember the first time I saw Tony Snow on television. But I know it’s been very many memorable years ago.

What struck me most about this fine man, was his optimism about life. Whether I saw him on Fox News Channel, or listened in to his own radio show or Rush Limbaugh’s, I knew it would be a thoroughly captivating and educational time. I knew the time I spent with him would leave me feeling there were options out there I may not have considered. Options that would uplift our America instead of trash it. Options that were feasible.

And when he moved into the White House as Press Secretary, how happy I was to know I’d get to hear from him almost every day.

His husky yet soothing voice was unmistakable. And I would often be thrilled by the manner in which he would deliver his thoughts. As an author, I admire how others string sentences together and he did it so elegantly.

When a man dies, you usually get to know his character by the tributes of his family, friends and colleagues. Everyone was in awe of the manner in which he lived his life before and after he learned of his cancer challenges.

It’s said it’s not how we lived, but moreso how we died. From the accounts of all his colleagues, Tony worked through his illness with class and grace. He was a wonderful example of keeping his hopes high that he would beat his colon cancer.

My thoughts these last few days have been with his family, of course, but also his colleagues. It’s an interesting dynamic which takes place when it’s a dear friend who dies.

In Tony’s case, he’s in the media spotlight. Most of us will honor our friend and then go back to work immediately. But their loss and presence will be felt when we see their office empty, when they aren’t around to reach out to when you have a thought or are working on a project you know their advice would be valuable.

So I want to acknowledge and validate the pain of a friend’s grief. It’s real and sometimes it’s more real than grieving for a distant relative or other relative with whom we barely had a relationship. But a friend, and especially a business colleague…well, we’d see them or speak with them continually in the process of fulfilling our work. The vacuum left by their empty office, voice, writing, strategy, humor, talents will be felt for a very long time.

And when we lose a man like Tony, the level of that pain and loss, felt at FOX and on the radio and in the White House is significant.

When I think about the people I’d like to have the honor of meeting in my lifetime, Mr. Tony Snow was right up there on the list. I feel sad I’ll not get that pleasure now.